New York Times shines a light on 'laid-back' Auckland's sophistication

A New York Times travel writer has taken a liking to Auckland City. Photo / Brett Phibbs
A New York Times travel writer has taken a liking to Auckland City. Photo / Brett Phibbs

Auckland's laid-back feel and sophistication are outlined for readers of the New York Times, one of the world's most influential news titles.

In the publication's 36 hours slot - "What to do when you've got 36 hours to get to know a city" - travel writer Elaine Glusac samples slices of the city's life and its treats.

She liked what she found.

"The New Zealand city is laid-back and outdoorsy, but its sophistication shines in its expanding art scene, thriving fashion industry and a new generation of chefs embracing native ingredients."

But in an article devoted mainly to Auckland's natural treasures, cultural and commercial attractions, and good coffee, Glusac finds space to join the city's inhabitants in moaning about the traffic.

She declares: "Close to one-third of New Zealand's estimated 4.5 million population lives in Auckland, a geographically blessed - and traffic cursed - city spread over at least 50 volcanic cones on a North Island neck of land between two large harbours."

Glusac's 36 hours took her on a swing through the Auckland Art Gallery and the Auckland Museum, along Karangahape Rd, the city's "counter cultural side", an America's Cup sailing experience, part of the Coast to Coast walkway, Britomart, Wynyard Quarter and Waiheke Island.

Impressed by the museum, she wondered at its full name.

"Devoted to the story of New Zealand from geology to politics, the Auckland War Memorial Museum holds treasures obscured by its title, namely the vast collection of indigenous Maori art works and crafts."

For sustenance, Glusac delighted in an "edible landscape" at one restaurant, Pasture, whose offerings included smoked quince and butter aged "so it tastes like Camembert", and in the "unusual dishes" such as spicy peanut butter and carrot kimchi on toast at Orphans Kitchen.

"Coffee-crazed New Zealand is a country where you can find a barista at a rural gas station. Espresso bars seem stationed on every corner in Auckland."

The co-owner of Pasture, Laura Verner, told the Herald it was a nice surprise to be featured in the Times and she hoped it would be good for business. The Parnell restaurant was rarely full despite having only 20 seats.

She said the restaurant had not solicited the Times' attention.

"I had no idea Elaine was from the New York Times. We found out months afterwards when she wrote to us to clarify details."

Verner said Pasture, which opened in August 2016, had hosted many foreign visitors. It had a strong international following, having featured in overseas publications and through social media.

- NZ Herald

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